Fireworks Permit Sales Available in City of Sand Springs

The City of Sand Springs will offer fireworks permits for $20 each for any resident wishing to discharge fireworks within the city limits of Sand Springs. Walk up sales for the mandatory permits begin on Wednesday, June 19, and will end at 4:00 p.m. on July 3. The permits must be purchased by an adult age 18 or older that serves as the responsible party for activities at an individual residence. Permits are non-transferable.

During the holiday, permit holders can use residential streets as a fireworks discharge area provided that activities do not hinder traffic and all debris is removed. Fireworks may be discharged in the Sand Springs city limits on July 3 from 6:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. and on July 4 from 11:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m. No other use of fireworks is allowed outside of these times.

Permits can be purchased using either of two methods: 1) purchase in person at Sand Springs Fire Department Administration Offices, located at 108 E Broadway St; 2) purchase online at www.sandspringsok.org/fwpermit

Citizens opting to purchase in person can visit the Fire Administration office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on weekdays beginning Wednesday, June 19 and running through Wednesday, July 3. Fire Administration will remain open during the lunch hour to accommodate purchases during the week of Monday, June 24 through Friday, June 28.

“Last year’s success of online sales makes purchasing more convenient with less time restrictions on when they can be purchased,” said Sand Springs Deputy Fire Chief Justin Hall. Online sales will end however at 4:00 p.m. on July 4. There will be a processing fee of approximately $2 added to each electronic transaction.

Although fireworks can be enjoyed by citizens, fire officials urge residents to remember that live fireworks often frighten and stress animals. Officials ask that citizens take a moment to secure their pets to reduce the chances of animals running away.

Fees collected from permits help offset overtime costs of police and fire officials who patrol neighborhoods on this busy holiday to assure fireworks are being discharged responsibly with a valid permit. Without the permit, the pre-set court fine for illegally discharging of fireworks in the city limits is $171. However, a maximum fine of $500 plus court costs can be imposed for serious or repetitive violations.

For further information about fireworks permits, call the Sand Springs Fire Administration Office at 918-246-2548.

3rd Annual Cheers & Gears Auto Show set for June 22nd at Charles Page High School

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The Third Annual Cheers & Gears Auto Show will return to the Charles Page High School parking lot Saturday, June 22nd in Sand Springs. The event is hosted by the Sandite Cheer Team as an annual fundraiser.

All makes, models and years of cars, trucks, Rat Rods and Kit Cars can be shown. Registration will be from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m. with a $25 fee for each vehicle.

Admission is free for spectators not exhibiting a vehicle. Dash plaques and goody bags will be given to the first 20 entries. All of the entrants will receive a ticket for the door prize drawings. Awards will be presented at 3:00 p.m. The event has something for everyone, including: food trucks, snow cones, drink & candy concessions, live DJ, t-shirts and hourly raffles.

4th year CPHS Varsity Cheer Coach Carrie Schlehuber is ready to welcome back many of the cheerleaders’ favorite cars and their owners, but is also excited to see and hear the new competition. “I remember when I was in school how we wanted to show off our new wheels… and many of us wanted to “sound off” too!”

This year the show has been expanded to over 20 classes including specialty awards with trophies for each. The “Loud & Proud” award will be given to the best sounding car when it revs up its engine. Also “Show Your Colors” trophies will be awarded to the Best Paint jobs for Original and Custom paint. The coveted “Cheer Choice” Award is chosen and presented by the Varsity Cheerleaders. All of the awards are unique handmade trophies designed and created by CPHS Tech Students.

Vendor parking spaces (or booth spaces) are available and also sponsor opportunities. For more show information, contact CPHS Varsity Cheer at cphsvarsitycheer@gmail.com.

For more information about the Cheers & Gears Auto Show, to download entry forms for auto owners, and for sponsorship and vendor opportunities, visit the show web site at https://www.cheersandgearsautoshow.com

Flood damage cleanup day scheduled for Case Community Park

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Sand Springs, OK - The Sand Springs Local Church Network and the City of Sand Springs is teaming up to create a special Case Community Park Cleanup event this Saturday, June 8, 2019.

The volunteer cleanup event is open to everyone and will be assisted by City of Sand Springs Parks staff. Volunteers should arrive before 8:00 a.m. Parking will be located at the south end of the Case Community Center parking lot (1050 W. Wekiwa Road, Sand Springs, OK). All volunteers will be asked to sign in, in order to help the community receive additional FEMA credit for their efforts.

Volunteers will split into several teams, covering much of the 120-acre park site, which was heavily damaged from the historical flood event this month. Workers are advised to wear work clothes, gloves, proper footwear, hat and sunscreen. The event is weather dependent.

All parties interested in helping out should monitor the City of Sand Springs Facebook page, which includes a “special event” posting on this gathering with real time updates including weather information.

Volunteers do not need to bring anything, however those who are able and willing to bring and operate small chain saws and gasoline powered backpack blowers are needed. Sweep brooms are also needed. Other tasks will include relocating metal bleachers washed away; picking up tree debris, operating pressure washers, sweeping and blowing off concrete walks, splash pads and more.

Senator Ikley-Freeman Statement on Tulsa Area Flooding

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TULSA – Senator Allison Ikley-Freeman, D-Tulsa, released the following statement addressing the recent flooding in Tulsa:

“Today we received an update from the Army Corps of Engineers indicating releases from the Keystone Dam are falling and the level of the Arkansas River is dropping. While this is welcome news, it is important for residents to be aware the situation is still very serious, and health and safety risks remain. As floodwaters recede, neighborhoods will be inspected for safety before evacuated residents are able to return.

“The last few weeks have been very challenging for our communities, but our residents are tough and resilient. Please remember that nobody has to go through this alone; there are many resources available to help those affected by the flooding and severe weather. Residents can still dial 2-1-1 to request assistance. My constituents in District 37 can also call my office at (405) 521-5600 if you have questions or have a specific request for assistance. If you are able to volunteer with relief efforts, please contact the Red Cross at 1-800-733-2767 or visit their website at redcross.org.

“Over the coming weeks and months, I will work tirelessly to make sure our communities have the tools to begin the long road to recovery. I have been coordinating with officials at the federal, state, and local levels on relief efforts and will continue working with them through the recovery process. I want to thank Tulsa City Councilor Jeannie Cue, County Commissioner Karen Keith, and all of the officials who have put in countless hours assisting impacted communities. We also acknowledge and thank the Army Corps of Engineers, Oklahoma National Guard, and first responders for all they have done to protect us. We will continue to come together as Oklahomans and we will move forward.”

Residents Urged to Use Caution When Reentering Flooded Homes

As many residents prepare to return to their homes and property damaged by floodwaters, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) encourages the public to use caution when reentering their home.

Scott Sproat, director of the OSDH Emergency Preparedness and Response Service, said there are a number of factors for residents to consider.

“In the upcoming weeks, there will be many Oklahomans returning to damaged homes,” said Sproat. “We want to ensure the public’s health and safety as we continue to recover from the recent disaster.”

If a flooded home has been closed up for several days, residents should assume there is mold and take proper precautions. Occupants should enter the home briefly to open doors and windows to let the house air out for at least 30 minutes before staying for any length of time. After standing water has been removed, use fans and dehumidifiers to help remove excess moisture. Fans should be placed at a window or door to blow the air outwards rather than inwards, so not to spread the mold.

It is recommended to have the home’s heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system checked and cleaned by a maintenance or service professional who is experienced in mold cleanup before being turned on. If the HVAC system was flooded with water, turning on the mold-contaminated HVAC will spread mold throughout the house. Professional cleaning will kill the mold and prevent later mold growth. When the service determines that the system is clean and if it is safe to do so, turn it on and use it to help remove excess moisture from your home.

The following additional safety tips are recommended:

  • Ensure the utilities to a flooded building are shut off. Homeowners who are not familiar with electricity or their home’s electrical system should contact a professional to help make the property safe from electrical hazards.

  • Use flashlights. Avoid using lanterns, torches or matches to examine dark buildings. Flammable gases may be present and open flames can cause a fire or explosion.

  • Generators or other gasoline-powered machinery should only be used outdoors away from doors and windows as carbon monoxide exhaust can be fatal.

  • Contact your doctor if you’re concerned about medications having spoiled.

  • Throw away food that may have come in contact with flood or storm water as well as perishable foods which have not been refrigerated properly due to power outages. When in doubt, throw it out.

  • Be on the lookout for snakes or rodents which may be looking for shelter on higher ground.

For more information about safety after a disaster, visit www.cdc.gov or www.ready.gov.

Chillin n Grillin BBQ Festival and Carnival returns to Sand Springs Thursday through Saturday

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The Sand Springs Chamber of Commerce will be hosting the 8th Annual Chillin n Grillin BBQ Festival on May 30, 31, and June 1st on 1st St. and Garfield Ave. The event has evolved into a three day event with a carnival being the headline on Thursday and Friday and then the BBQ will permeate downtown Friday night and all day Saturday. Several new activities and attractions have been added to the event.

Thursday May 30th 6:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Miscee Ann Smith will perform an acoustic jam session 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. while the carnival rides are available. There will also be food trucks to tempt your pallet, so bring your best gal or guy, grab a plate of food and listen to some great music.

Friday May 31st 6:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Live music will start at 6:00 p.m. featuring our very own Jennifer Marriott Band. Again the food trucks will be available along with beer and the carnival rides.

Saturday June 1st 10:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.

The gates will open to the public at 10:00 a.m. with arts and crafts vendors, carnival and the Express Employment Clydesdales (11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.). Our Crowd Grub will open at 11:00 a.m. for some Award-Winning Pulled Pork Tacos, and live music from Nightingale Band featuring Bri Wright (11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.) and then a live remote with Big Country 99.5 FM (12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.). Prizes for BBQ Contest winners will be announced at 3:00 p.m. The carnival will run until 10:00 p.m.

“Amidst all of the devastation happening at this time, we feel everyone needs a little something to smile about and family fun,” said Chamber President Kristen Cepak. “The Chamber is proud to announce that a large portion of our profits will be donated to the Sand Springs Community Services for flood relief to our community.”

The Sand Springs Chamber of Commerce started this event in 2011 with just a few teams. As the event has grown, the community has begun to look forward to it each year. The highlight this year is the Carnival. The community can purchase wrist bands for $20 in advance, $25 ad the gate, and ride unlimited rides on Thursday and Friday. Saturdays’ rides will be by ticket only. Tickets are $3 per ride.

For all of the details on Chillin n Grillin BBQ Festival go to the Chamber website; http://sandspringschamber.com/. You will be able to purchase wrist bands and taster kits.

Evacuations continue in Sand Springs as flood waters rise, Keystone output surpasses 205,000 cfs

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Sand Springs, OK - The City of Sand Springs is advising Meadow Valley residents and others living in low lying areas along the Arkansas River to expect REAL flooding to occur and to take immediate action. The City is advising residents to take immediate actions to remove or protect property from those areas, and to consider a voluntary evacuation by 6:00 p.m. today. There is no mandatory evacuation in place.

With new information this morning from the USACE of dam releases increasing to 215,000 cfs later today and holding there, the City expects portions of the Meadow Valley neighborhood, and potentially others, to flood. This flood event is expected to last for several days. Highway 51 near 137th West Avenue will likely flood, making vehicular traffic there impossible.

Last night the City of Sand Springs declared an emergency disaster proclamation, with actions to take place designed to protect public health, reduce damage and render emergency services to citizens. Officials from Webco Industries have made changes to their operations at the former “STAR” center until this flood event has passed and are closed. Case Community Park remains closed with warnings for citizens not to enter. City Police and Fire crews are working the various scenes around the clock to monitor.

If an American Red Cross emergency shelter is needed later, plans are in place now for that to happen. The City reminds area residents to monitor the City of Sand Springs Face Book page for real time updates.

City of Sand Springs Advising Citizens for Flood Potential

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Sand Springs, OK - The City of Sand Springs is advising area residents, especially those in the Meadow Valley housing neighborhood to brace for the potential of additional flooding. Although the rain event has stopped for now, the lag time for waters upstream of Keystone Dam to reach Sand Springs can delay flooding activities downstream for several hours.

Last night, City of Sand Springs Police and Fire teams reached out (via phone messages and neighborhood visits) to residents in the Meadow Valley neighborhood, along HWY 51 in Sand Springs to alert residents of the potential for flooding. This area, and others in Tulsa County which may not be in City limits but are near the Arkansas River, may be affected by the planned increases in outflows from Keystone Dam later tonight.

In Sand Springs City limits, Case Community Park has now closed until further notice. All sports and trail related activities are cancelled at this site. The Case Community Center (1050 W. Wekiwa Road) however remains open.

The City urges residents to pay attention to street closures and the accompanying traffic barricades that are placed to protect public safety.

This afternoon, the USACE confirms that 100,000 cubic feet/ second (cfs) of water is being currently, with 20,000 cfs increases planned at 2 p.m.; 4 p.m. and 6 p.m., leaving the discharge at that time to be around 160,000 cfs. The USACE will revise dam operations as needed after that.

Oklahoma Kids Local Vocal Competition comes to Tulsa Area

America’s “Big League of Little Entertainers,” Oklahoma Kids, a division of American Kids Inc., has set a local competition on April 13th, 2019 to be held at the new Kiefer Event Center in Kiefer, OK. The entry deadline is April 9th, according to Oklahoma Kids National Director Nathan Johnson. The membership and competition is open to all youth ages 3 through high school seniors, 18 years old. Nikki Anderson, event coordinator, can be contacted with questions at (620) 875-3731 or by email at Nikki.euphoria@gmail.com. All states are invited to participate in this local competition., and Entry forms and guidelines are available at https://www.americankidsinc.com/forms-2/ and may be used by young performers in all states. All Entry forms are due by April 9th .

The competition event will begin with registration at 9 a.m., followed by a brief parents meeting, with the Competition beginning immediately following the meeting. There will be an Awards Ceremony to conclude the day with a wide variety of prizes from cash to medals and trophies for five different age divisions at all levels of competition. The different levels of competition include six categories: Country Vocal, Gospel Vocal, Serious/Classical Vocal, Musical Theater, Popular Vocal, and Specialty Acts.

The Kiefer Local Competition event is followed by optional progressive levels of talent competitions, including a State Competition for qualifying acts which is held at the beautiful McSwain Theater in Ada, Oklahoma in June. The American Kids competition season will conclude with Nationals and an All Star
Show the third weekend in July in Nashville, Tennessee. The All Star Show is judged by entertainment industry professionals who will choose our new Entertainer of the Year for 2019.

“Our members present a wide variety of performances on the local, state and national level to share their talent for the benefit of others. 2019 will be a very exciting year for Oklahoma Kids with performances in several states nationwide, which are currently being cast,” said Nathan Johnson, National Director. “Members enjoy exposure, growth, character development, and opportunity. Because of the experiences gained from being on stage, members are better prepared for whatever they choose to do in life. Many members are performing on Broadway and on tour with Disney and in Branson and Nashville: Blake Shelton, Kristin Chenoweth, Carrie Underwood, Bryan White, Darci Lynn, and Alaska and Madi are all alumni of Oklahoma Kids,” according to American Kids Founder, Dr. Dale Smith.

Senate Review by Senator Allison Ikley-Freeman

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The following article contains opinions from the author that do not necessarily reflect those of Sandite Pride News or its staff. To submit an Op-ed contact Sanditepridenews@gmail.com

Last Thursday was the final day for third reading of bills in the House of origin. This simply means bills not passed off the Senate floor are dead for this session. We start the next step in the legislative process as we begin to consider House bills in Senate committees. Last year, the Legislature considered 2,289 bills, of which only 324 became law. This year, 1,061 SBs and Senate Joint Resolutions have been filed, with 429 passing off the Senate floor in time for last week’s deadline.  

I currently serve on five Senate committees; Education, Appropriations, Budget & Rules, Health & Human Services and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Health and Human Services. 

Ensuring access to quality health care and mental health care services are just two of my passions and my professional experience as a mental health therapist brings a unique perspective and skillset to my role as a legislator. Focusing on the importance of mental health, I authored several measures this year that would be another step in helping students in Oklahoma schools.

Senate Bill 266 requires each school district to adopt policies related to suicide awareness and training and the reporting of student drug abuse. This includes adopting a training program and providing the program made available by the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse (ODMHSAS). Teachers, students, and administrators are granted immunity from employment discipline and civil liability for carrying out certain actions detailed by the measure. I authored this bill because it’s essential for more people to understand depression and suicidality and the importance of increasing awareness in our district and across the state. Just within our Senate district, schools report seeing an average of eight suicide notes a day. This is an eye-opening statistic that supports the need for increased education, programming and funding to address mental health care for Oklahoma’s students.

A second bill I authored this session is Senate Bill 452, which was created as a result of an interim study between the Department of Juvenile Affairs, DMHSAS and the Department of Education to create alternatives to school suspension for students. SB 452 directs school districts to consider restorative practices instead of out-of-school suspension for students who assault school personnel. Restorative practices could include community service, requiring the student to apologize, assessment for mental health, and referrals to mental health professionals and would be made available to all students of the district. The measure specifies that school districts must provide for a student’s reengagement if suspension or alternative school settings are utilized and also asks school districts to create a threat assessment for a student convicted of a violent crime.

If you are excited or concerned about any piece of legislation moving into the Senate from the House in the coming weeks; especially related to the committees I serve on, please reach out and let’s talk. Don't forget include your address so we know you are a constituent of our district. If you need help determining your Senate district, we would be happy to assist you. If you are visiting the Capitol and would like to stop by, our new office is located in Room 524.

As always, on any issue please feel free to contact my office at 405-521-5600 or at Allison.ikley.freeman@oksenate.gov. Please let me or my assistant, Audra, know if we can be of assistance to you. It is an honor to serve Senate District 37 and I look forward to continuing to represent you.  

Senate Review by Senator Allison Ikley-Freeman

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The following article contains opinions from the author that do not necessarily reflect those of Sandite Pride News or its staff. To submit an Op-ed contact Sanditepridenews@gmail.com

As the end of the fifth legislative week comes to a close, our focus has now shifted to hearing bills on the Senate floor. Last week was the deadline for Senate bills to be heard in committee, and at the end of that deadline there were still 511 bills in committee, with 9 failing in committee. As of the end of this week, there were 333 pending bills on Senate General Order, with 201 already passed on the Senate floor and sent to the House. Our next deadline is March 14, which is the last date for bills and joint resolutions to be heard in their chamber of origin. Any measures not heard by this date are generally considered dead for this legislative year.

Many of you know one of my strongest areas of interest and focus is mental health. Before being elected to the Senate, I worked as a mental health counselor. It’s always been my belief that it’s less expensive to address mental health issues early, so early intervention in public schools is a logical place to start. 

Oklahoma has some of the highest rates for mental illness and substance use disorders. In 2012, Oklahoma ranked third in the nation (22.4%) in any mental illness and second in the nation (11.9%) for substance abuse disorders. This means that between 700,000 and 950,000 adult Oklahomans need services, but most are not receiving the care they need to recover from their illnesses. As the years have passed, the statistics haven’t changed much, and in some regards, have grown more even more concerning.

This week, the full Senate approved Senate Bill 257, which increases the full-time employee limit from one to two employees for the State Board of Licensed Social Workers. The Board currently utilizes one full time employee and two temporary employees to supervise almost 1,500 licensed social workers. Licensure boards assist the government in fulfilling one of its main covenants to the public- protection from harm. By having specific occupations regulated through licensing government can help its citizens know when someone offering goods or services in this area is meeting basic expectations for safety of their consumers. An understaffed board translates to less thorough supervision and can lead over time to a lack of meeting the public's expectations. This change will help the State Board of Licensed Social Workers continue to meet your standards for public safety in the profession. 

It’s an honor to serve Senate District 37 and I look forward to continuing to represent you in the days ahead. As always, I welcome your input on concerns and issues. If you are visiting the Capitol and would like to stop by, our new office is located in Room 524. My office number is remains (405) 521-5600 and my email is allison.ikley.freeman@oksenate.gov. Please let me or my assistant, Audra, know if we can be of assistance to you.

Senate approves pre-registration for young Oklahoma voters

OKLAHOMA CITY – The Senate unanimously approved legislation Wednesday to ensure young Oklahomans do not miss their first elections. Sen. Jason Smalley is the author of Senate Bill 496 to allow those who are at least 17.5 to 18 years old to pre-register to vote.

“Currently, Oklahomans can’t register to vote until they’re 18 years old.  This can cause them to miss voting if their birthdays fall after the registration deadline for an upcoming election,” said Smalley, R-Stroud.  “Casting one’s first vote is such an exciting right of passage for a young person.  By allowing them to pre-register, they can actually vote on their 18thbirthday rather than waiting for their registration to be processed.”

Under SB 496, anyone who pre-registers to vote prior to their 18th birthday will be allowed to vote beginning on their birthday. 

The measure now moves to the House for further consideration.

Storm Spotter Training Class rescheduled for late February

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Sand Springs, OK - A Storm Spotter Training Class originally scheduled for January 30th in Sand Springs has been postponed till February 27th due to the recent Federal Government Shutdown.

The class will be administered by meteorologists from the National Weather Service (NWS), which is a division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Weather changes constantly in Oklahoma – and sometimes not for the better. Understanding what is going on in the skies above can be a life or death proposition.

Sand Springs’ location on the western edge of the Tulsa metropolitan area places it on the front lines for severe weather events, which can potentially impact thousands of Oklahomans. Trained citizen storm spotters play a critical role in providing life-saving information to local emergency managers and meteorologists at the NWS office in Tulsa.

Area residents can receive storm spotter training from NWS meteorologists on Wednesday, February 27th, 2019, at 7:00 p.m. at the Case Community Center, 1050 W. Wekiwa Rd. There is no charge to attend, and pre-registration is not necessary. The training lasts about two hours.

The training benefits all citizens – from those affiliated with storm spotting organizations to those just wanting a better understanding of what is happening around them when skies turn dark. It includes videos of severe storms and information on how severe storms form and what they look like. The training will include statistics on severe storms and the damages they cause each time severe weather happens.

The training will help citizens better understand the different severe weather watches and warnings issued by NWS and help storm spotters analyze the differences between storms with real severe weather potential from those that only have menacing-looking clouds.

Although recent technology has greatly enhanced meteorologists’ abilities to provide critical and accurate storm information, trained storm spotters are irreplaceable for providing on-the-ground accounts of what is actually happening at specific locations. Many citizens have taken the class over the years to enhance their own piece of mind, as well as possibly save the lives of others during a weather emergency. 

City of Sand Springs Budget Fair Set for January 28th

Sand Springs, OK - The City of Sand Springs announces an opportunity for citizens to provide input into annual budget priorities for the community. This year's Budget Fair will take place on Monday, January 28, 2019, from 5:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. at the Sand Springs Municipal Building, 100 E. Broadway, in downtown Sand Springs. This come and go event will take place on the second floor.

Department leaders including police, fire, parks, public works and more will be on-hand to listen to citizen input and help answer questions about annual operations and explain typical annual budget priorities. The Sand Springs City Council and City staff extend this important public opportunity to residents living within the corporate limits of Sand Springs to participate in the creation of the upcoming Fiscal Year 2020 Budget. The City's annual budget year begins on July 1, 2019, and runs through June 30, the following year.

Sen. Boren files legislation to increase funding for textbooks and other instructional materials

State Sen. Mary Boren has filed legislation aimed at putting more resources directly in the classroom for textbooks and other teaching materials.  Her legislation also requires funding allocated for instructional materials is used for that purpose. 

Boren, a former educator who has previously worked for both the State Department of Education the State Regents for Higher Education, said Senate Bill 206 would increase the per pupil amount for textbook and other instructional materials, which includes things like e-books, software and other related materials.  The measure would increase that amount from $55 to $200.

“When I worked for the Department of Education in 2001, the state was providing $55 per student.  Even though costs have risen dramatically since then, that amount is still just $55—plus, during the economic downturn, districts were given the ability to redirect those funds to other areas,” said Boren, D-Norman.  

“The combined result is school after school with tattered, outdated and insufficient textbooks and instructional materials and teachers and supporters being forced to plead for donations.  If we want our children to be able to compete, they need current textbooks and materials.  Forcing teachers and supporters to turn to outside fundraising may help in wealthier districts, but in many communities throughout the state, the resources simply aren’t there and our children are not getting the instructional materials they need to succeed. After looking at other states and visiting with Oklahoma teachers and administrators, it’s clear that $200 is a much more accurate reflection of the actual cost of instructional materials.”

Boren pointed out that since statehood, Oklahoma’s Constitution has required the state to provide textbooks.

“The vision for our public schools was that all children would have an equitable educational opportunity but without adequate state support it cannot happen,” Boren said.  

Boren’s legislation would also expand textbook selection committees at the local level to make sure teachers from each school within a district are included in that process.

“Those committees are evaluating material for every grade level, but under the current structure, you may or may not have teachers from all grade levels included,” Boren said.  “My language will include teachers from each district’s elementary, middle and high schools on those textbook committees.”

Boren said the investment made in teacher salaries last year was a critical starting point for education in Oklahoma and hopes her legislation will represent the next step.

“As we consider turnaround strategies for our state, it must include an examination of the level of investment our students deserve.  Senate Bill 206 gives us that opportunity,” Boren said.

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4th Annual Ancient Trail Trek to benefit Keystone Ancient Forest Visitors Center

Ancient Trail Trek Registration Open! Natural Trail Races Benefit the Keystone Ancient Forest Preserve! Sand Springs, OK - The City of Sand Springs Parks and Recreation Department and TATUR (Tulsa Area Trails and Ultra Runners) invite runners of all ages to the magnificent Keystone Ancient Forest for the 4th Annual Ancient Trail Trek! This year's event is Saturday, February 9, 2019 with gates opening at 7:00 a.m. and the first race at 8:00 a.m.

Event registration and information can be found at the City’s website at www.sandspringsok.org. Use the Explore/ Keystone Ancient Forest/ Ancient Trail Trek drop down menus to access the registration site. Registration is online only, and runners must register before the midnight deadline on February 7, 2019.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the beautiful 1,400-acre crosstimbers nature preserve, including the planned visitor center, which is currently in design.

This year's Ancient Fun Run offers a 5K, 10K and even an 8-mile run for both adults and children. The varied courses will meander over grassy trail portions, bare soil and rock. Routes will challenge runners with some downhill glides and moderate uphill challenges! Runners can glimpse wintertime views of Keystone Lake below, and might even spot area wildlife along the course!

"We’ve partnered with the TATUR group again and so we’ll have the standard electronic timing devices for accuracy and convenience for runners,” stated Jeff Edwards, Parks Director for the City of Sand Springs. "We’ve got several great courses this year and feel we have one of the best trail running venues in Oklahoma."

The race fee (including registration) is $28.00 per runner without an event T-shirt, or $40.50 per runner with an event T-shirt. Gates will open at 7:00 a.m. on the day of the race, with the first race beginning at 8:00 a.m.

Park staff and members of the Keystone Ancient Forest Trail Guide (volunteer) group will be on site to help with water and hospitality after the race. Parking is on gravel and grassy areas with porta potty service. No pets allowed.

With proceeds from this year’s race, again going towards the Keystone Ancient Forest- this year’s event can help with the planned visitor center also! The concept for the forest’s new state of the art facility will be unveiled just weeks before the race event!

Storm Spotter Training Class coming soon to Sand Springs

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Sand Springs, OK - Weather changes constantly in Oklahoma – and sometimes not for the better. Understanding what is going on in the skies above can be a life or death proposition.

Sand Springs’ location on the western edge of the Tulsa metropolitan area places it on the front lines for severe weather events, which can potentially impact thousands of Oklahomans. Trained citizen storm spotters play a critical role in providing life-saving information to local emergency managers and meteorologists at the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Tulsa.

Area residents can receive storm spotter training from NWS meteorologists on Wednesday, January 30, 2019, at 7:00 p.m. at the Case Community Center, 1050 W. Wekiwa Rd. There is no charge to attend, and pre-registration is not necessary. The training lasts about two hours.

The training benefits all citizens – from those affiliated with storm spotting organizations to those just wanting a better understanding of what is happening around them when skies turn dark. It includes videos of severe storms and information on how severe storms form and what they look like. The training will include statistics on severe storms and the damages they cause each time severe weather happens.

The training will help citizens better understand the different severe weather watches and warnings issued by NWS and help storm spotters analyze the differences between storms with real severe weather potential from those that only have menacing-looking clouds.

Although recent technology has greatly enhanced meteorologists’ abilities to provide critical and accurate storm information, trained storm spotters are irreplaceable for providing on-the-ground accounts of what is actually happening at specific locations. Many citizens have taken the class over the years to enhance their own piece of mind, as well as possibly save the lives of others during a weather emergency.

City Invites Local Businesses to Join at Tulsa Home and Garden Show

Sand Springs, OK - The City of Sand Springs is announcing its plans for the 2019 Tulsa Home and Garden show. This year the City is extending an invitation to Sand Springs retail businesses to join them during the show to promote the Sand Springs community- and their business! The annual home improvement event takes place March 7-10, at the Riverspirit Expo at the Expo Square Tulsa County Fairgrounds.

For more than a decade municipalities have reached out to area citizens during the Tulsa Home and Garden Show as a means to promote their community to area citizens by providing information about quality of life, new projects, services and more. This year, the City of Sand Springs wishes to expand on that approach by including a handful of local retailers.

“We’re excited to invite our partners in the retail business sector to invest a little time with us and work alongside city staff as we promote Sand Springs,” stated Grant Gerondale, Community Development Director for the City. “Sand Springs has so many unique retail outlets, each with their own great history of successful business service and great products.”

Interested businesses can apply at no cost; however, each business will be asked to provide one or more door prizes to be given away during a raffle drawing. Door prize winners will then be asked to visit each Sand Springs retailer later to redeem their prize.

Businesses will also be asked to help staff their display portion of the booth during an assigned segment of the Tulsa Home and Garden Show. Most volunteer opportunities for each business will last approximately 4-6 hours. To apply, simply email Grant Gerondale at grant@sandspringsok.org with your request for an application! Deadline to apply is January 31, 2019.

Senate votes Greg Treat as president pro tempore

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OKLAHOMA CITY - Members of the Oklahoma Senate on Tuesday voted Senator Greg Treat as president pro tempore, the chamber’s top leadership post.

Treat previously served as the majority floor leader, the Senate’s second-highest leadership office, and was selected by Senate Republicans last year as their choice to lead the Senate. On Tuesday during organizational day, the entire Senate made it official and voted to name Treat as the Senate leader.

“I am humbled and honored to serve as the leader of the Oklahoma Senate. I very much appreciate my colleagues for their trust in my leadership and look forward to the challenge ahead. I also want to thank my wife and children. Without their love and support, I would not be able to serve in the Senate,” said Treat, R-Oklahoma City.

“As leader of the Senate I promise our chamber will work hard, we’ll work together across political parties, and we’ll work toward policies that are good for all Oklahomans. There are certainly challenges facing our state, but there is nothing standing in our way that we can’t overcome together. I am optimistic about the future of our state and feel very blessed to be in a position to help lead Oklahoma to an even better and brighter future.”

Treat lives in Oklahoma City with his wife Maressa and their three children: Mason, Cooper, and Olivia. The Treat family attends Frontline Church. He was elected in a 2011 special election to represent District 47, which encompasses northwest Oklahoma City and portions of Edmond, Deer Creek, and Bethany. Treat serves on the executive committees of both the National Conference of State Legislatures and the Southern Legislative Conference.

The Oklahoma Constitution calls upon the Legislature to meet before the start of each two-year session to formally elect its leaders and certify the previous year’s election results. On Tuesday, the Senate certified the 2018 election results and officially elected Treat and other senators to Senate leadership positions. The Senate GOP leadership includes:

  • Senator Greg Treat, R-Oklahoma City, President Pro Tempore

  • Senator Kim David, R-Porter, Majority Floor Leader

  • Senator Roger Thompson, R-Okemah, Appropriations chair

  • Senator Jason Smalley, R-Stroud, Majority Caucus chair

  • Senator Rob Standridge, R-Norman, Majority Whip

  • Senator Stephanie Bice, R-Oklahoma City, Assistant Floor Leader

  • Senator Frank Simpson, R-Springer, Assistant Floor Leader

  • Senator Dave Rader, R-Tulsa, Majority Caucus vice chair

  • Senator Julie Daniels, R-Bartlesville, Assistant Majority Whip

  • Senator Casey Murdock, R-Felt, Assistant Majority Whip

  • Senator Marty Quinn, R-Claremore, Assistant Majority Whip

  • Senator Darcy Jech, R-Kingfisher, Rural Caucus chair

Senator Allison Ikley-Freeman appointed to serve on five Senate committees

OKLAHOMA CITY –   State Senator Allison Ikley-Freeman was selected this week to serve on five Senate committees for the 57th legislature by Senate Democratic Leader Designate Kay Floyd. Ikley-Freeman represents District 37 which includes Sand Springs.

The Tulsa Democrat was appointed to serve on the Education, Appropriations and Budget and Rules Committees. She will also continue to serve on both the Senate Committee for Health and Human Services and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Health and Human Services.

“I am honored to have been chosen by Senator Floyd to serve on these committees,” Ikley-Freeman said. “Ensuring access to health care and mental health care services are just two of my passions and my professional experience as a mental health therapist brings a unique perspective and skillset to my role as a legislator.” 

Ikley-Freeman holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in clinical mental health. She continues to work in her community providing mental health services and fighting for increased access at the Capitol.

Members will return to the Capitol for an organizational day on January 8, 2019, and the 2019 session will formally begin on February 4.